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frugal technology, simple living and guerrilla large-appliance repair
Fri, 28 Sep 2012

Lots of updates today in Debian Wheezy, plus when I think it will go Stable and why I stick with Debian as my distro of choice

Quite a few updates moved for Debian's Wheezy testing branch today. I got a lot of GNOME bits and, for some reason, qemu-kvm.

The Debian Project is pushing Wheezy ever closer to release. The way things are going, counting the number of release-critical bugs and comparing it to roughly the same period before the release of Squeeze (the current Stable release), there are now 243 release-critical bugs remaining to be solved before Wheezy's release can happen. In September 2010, there were 126 RC bugs remaining to be solved.

Squeeze was released in February 2011, and if the RC-bug count is any indication, we won't see Wheezy go Stable this year, even though that was an early goal of the project.

I do believe we will see a Stable Wheezy by in early 2013, since Etch (4/8/2007), Lenny (2/15/2009) and Squeeze (2/6/2011) have been spaced pretty much two years apart, with the last two releases happening in February of their respective years.

A Stable Debian Wheezy will happen, and for that I thank the many Debian Developers and Maintainers around the world, as well as the hundreds of upstream developers whose work goes into producing Debian GNU/Linux (and the rest of the Linux distributions) with such high quality and usability.

I always say I'm going to run something other than Debian, but the combination of technical excellence, stability, support and (on my part) familiarity keeps me with the distribution I discovered very early into my exploration of Linux and BSD when I first tried Etch and was extremely surprised at how Ubuntu was pretty much just Debian with a lot of brown and orange layered on top of it.

I have great respect for many operating-system projects, and I have benefited greatly from using Ubuntu, Fedora, CentOS/Scientific Linux, Slackware, OpenBSD and FreeBSD over the years. I've learned a lot and got a whole bunch of work done.

But Debian remains my "home" distribution. My hardware likes it, and so do I.