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frugal technology, simple living and guerrilla large-appliance repair
Fri, 07 Apr 2017

This is what happens when you create a file in the Windows Subsystem for Linux and try to edit it with a Windows application

As I experiment with the Windows Subsystem for Linux (aka the Bash shell provided by Ubuntu for Windows 10), I am trying to figure exactly what I can and can't do.

To that end, I created a file with Vim in the WSL. Then I tried to open it with a text editor in Windows. I get this popup that says I can't do it:

In case you're not seeing the image above (and because Google), the Error dialog reads:

Error saving file. Error renaming temporary file: Permission denied

The file on disk may not be truncated!

I also tried to use the Windows file manager to drop the above image, created in Windows, into the WSL portion of the disk. That file "shows" in the Windows file manager, but it doesn't appear at all in the Bash shell. I had to use Bash to copy it from the Windows side to the WSL/Linux side: That's what works, in case you were wondering.

I really need an easy drag/drop between Windows and the WSL ...

Update: This issue is addressed in a very interesting bug report with a lot of links I need to explore.

Also, in the image file I copied from Windows into Bash on Windows (as Microsoft seems to like to call it), the .jpg file was too wide open on permissions. It was 777, and I wanted 644. I made the change in Bash and am syncing with the server.